de Bijenkorf Amsterdam womens designer
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz
  • photo Arjen Schmitz

    For luxury department store De Bijenkorf , Bearandbunny conceived an inviting high-end multi-designer brand shopping experience in Amsterdam. The challenge was to underline the identity of De Bijenkorf as a magnet for international fashion lovers, yet create a holistic design...more

    For luxury department store De Bijenkorf , Bearandbunny conceived an inviting high-end multi-designer brand shopping experience in Amsterdam. The challenge was to underline the identity of De Bijenkorf as a magnet for international fashion lovers, yet create a holistic design scheme that would appeal to the independent luxury brands, usually inclined to opt for a shop-in-shop approach.

    Retail in such a dynamic environment has many alternating functions: you like people to actually buy, but also want to make them feel relaxed. The idea was to create a refuge for wellbeing in hectic downtown. The designers uncovered the massive windows, making shoppers feel at ease through abundant daylight and gain a sense of orientation as to their current location in town.

    Conceptually, the department is approached as a white canvas on which brands showcase their fashion. De Bijenkorf as curator, showing the world what inspires her. It results in a timeless space where its design is in direct service to the constantly changing collections. No space for ego.

    True seduction takes on magical character in the cocoon-ish fitting rooms: filled with daylight, soft-toned colors and tactile materials, and carefully placed lights and mirrors, they make one face the best version of oneself.

    Bearandbunny created an outspoken retail space in where de Bijenkorf can show her new role as international fashion curator. It allows her to showcase competing high-fashion brands in one united space, and distinguishes the department store’s own character. Luxury brands fully embraced the democratic design formula that advocates individual expression without dominating the apparel. The interior defines a new take on luxury, the organic floor plan, spacious daylight fitting rooms, and an exclusive personal shopping area are in in full service of her guests. Tactile coatings and a nude-and-pink based colour scheme present a feminine and friendly environment that makes one feel comfortable and let the apparel step in the limelight. The project shows a multi-level approach on sustainability, rearranging upcycling (ordinary) and leftover materials in unexpected ways, gives the space an edge. Distinctive layers of new and recycled materials (epoxy-treated corrugated fiberboard, marble, mirrored glass, electro-galvanized metal) are as much “in fashion” as they are neutral artifacts of a weirdly familiar tomorrow. Collaborating with local experts on handcrafted one-off pieces, using traditional production techniques, is creating an enduring, modern retail experience that outlives fashion’s rapidly changing nature by providing the exact conditions amid which she can flower, each time.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    de bijenkorf personal shopping
    • photo Arjen Schmitz
    • photo Arjen Schmitz

      DE BIJENKORF AMSTERDAM PERSONAL SHOPPING AREA

      High-end luxe in your personal soft box, containing a dressing room, a rest room, a make-up room, a bar, a lounge and a personal stylist.Feeling special and at ease in your private room with...more

      DE BIJENKORF AMSTERDAM PERSONAL SHOPPING AREA

      High-end luxe in your personal soft box, containing a dressing room, a rest room, a make-up room, a bar, a lounge and a personal stylist.Feeling special and at ease in your private room with a view.


      VILLA AMSTERDAM
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
      • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens

        VILLA AMSTERDAM

        An ambitious project with luxury appeal, the design of this private 800-sqm villa evolved from an initial inquiry for a complex extension to a complete renovation including garden architecture.
        With an indoor swimming pool and health club...more

        VILLA AMSTERDAM

        An ambitious project with luxury appeal, the design of this private 800-sqm villa evolved from an initial inquiry for a complex extension to a complete renovation including garden architecture.
        With an indoor swimming pool and health club dotting their wish list, the client, a small family in Amsterdam, wanted ‘anything but your usual home’. Yet a conversion at full throttle – resulting in a 500m2 annex to the house in the shape of a waterproof basement – proved to be more than a keen solution to an intricate practical problem.
        The so-called underwater extension became the designer’s answer to the problem of building restrictions on the plot that faces water on two sides. It also underlines their solution-led approach and bold design choices; a quality further expressed by combining no nonsense materials with precious ones. For instance, in the case of the swimming pool, opposing walls are constructed of concrete and Onyx, a semi-precious stone from Iran. Other materials used include stone, steel, wood, leather and brass.

        Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
        Photography: Bearandbunny
        Amsterdam / 2015


        Rebel and Ulla Models Antwerp
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens
        • production Verne Photography and Marc Heldens

          REBEL AND ULLA MODELS AGENCY ANTWERP
          When internationally operating model agency Ulla Models joined habitat with model agency Rebel at an rugged building in the ecological industrial estate Pakt in Antwerp, the challenge was clear: How to shelter two separate agencies within the...more

          REBEL AND ULLA MODELS AGENCY ANTWERP
          When internationally operating model agency Ulla Models joined habitat with model agency Rebel at an rugged building in the ecological industrial estate Pakt in Antwerp, the challenge was clear: How to shelter two separate agencies within the communal headquarters, each having their own list of needs and demands. The 4250m2 square-shaped room needed to accommodate  freestanding offices, a meeting room, photo studio and the best kitchen facilities. Most eye-popping feature is probably the big kitchen, executed in 'Lamoriniere Green' a tribute to history.  The type of green pigment is named after colour of green pigment favored by the famous Antwerp painter and etcher Jean Pierre Larmoriniere, who painted landscapes from nature based on his own observations. He worked and lived just next door at 161 and this way we keep his history alive. Fostering a healthy daily lunch with office-grown herbs and veggies, it shapes the face of the office as much as the mood of its employees. With Sergio Hermans restaurant The Jane next door, and plenty rooftop gardens growing the finest tomatoes in the area this Pakt area is the most upcoming neighborhood of Antwerp.  

           


          Reconstruction Office

            RECONSTRUCTING THE OFFICE
            The first thing we did when we started with the design of this Amsterdam South office building was to consider which building components we could reuse. The office layout previously existed of modular walls, from which we...more

            RECONSTRUCTING THE OFFICE
            The first thing we did when we started with the design of this Amsterdam South office building was to consider which building components we could reuse. The office layout previously existed of modular walls, from which we recycled the doors and the glass partitions. Along with the existing components we developed a few new wall types that reflect the bringing together of old and new, natural and synthetic. For the new layout we chose materials according to their raw and unprocessed qualities, and created a blank canvas for the employees to provoke their creative thinking. The layout has an open plan set-up to increase contact between departments, and the different wall types create a stimulating balance of materials and views/separations. New walls range from plywood elevator and stairs areas to glass partitioned workplaces, meeting rooms made of recycled greenhouse walls, and green plasterboard and polypress separation walls.

            Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard, Merijn Verduyn
            Photography: Bearandbunny
            Amsterdam / 2015


            AMERICA TODAY CHURCH
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers
            • photo Ewout Huibers

              AMERICAN CHURCH
              Fashion retailer America Today tasked us with converting a derelict 17th-century chapel in the Belgian city of Ostend into a modern clothing store. Our goal was to carry out the transformation of the church with respect for...more

              AMERICAN CHURCH
              Fashion retailer America Today tasked us with converting a derelict 17th-century chapel in the Belgian city of Ostend into a modern clothing store. Our goal was to carry out the transformation of the church with respect for the building’s architecture to let its former glory shine through, while at the same time creating enough display and storage space. The solution proved to be the construction of a mezzanine level in the apse of the church to accommodate fitting rooms and storage. The fitting rooms were installed in triptych form: a playful nod to the building’s former function. By the use of plain materials such as Oregon pine, blackened steel and plywood, we stressed the roots of America Today as an importer of authentic American campus style basic clothing. We further emphasized this connection by the instalment of a giant American-style fire escape: it separates the store from the street, yet also allows the shopping public a glimpse of the America Today devotees inside.

              Design team: John Maatman, Merijn Verduyn
              Photography: Ewout Huibers
              Ostend / 2014


              America Today

                TODAY...
                America Today asked us to update their corporate identity and create a fresh image for their company. We started out by cleaning up their logo and increasing the emotional impact of their slogans. Once established as an importer...more

                TODAY...
                America Today asked us to update their corporate identity and create a fresh image for their company. We started out by cleaning up their logo and increasing the emotional impact of their slogans. Once established as an importer of campus clothing straight from American source, the company has gradually shifted the focus to translating and creating college street style basics themselves. In other words, the emphasis is no longer on America, but on Today. We suggested a back to basics approach for the company, stressing simplicity and economy over heavy graphics and gimmicky design: DIY retail displays, handwritten slogans, duct tape announcements. Honest, straightforward, convenient, no frills. Today by America Today.

                Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard, Germans Ermičs
                Amsterdam / 2007


                BULLSEYE

                  BULLSEYE
                  Situated in a relatively quiet area of Almere, halfway between two prominent shopping centres, this shop ran the risk of being overlooked by the shopping public. Our remedy was bold and straightforward: by transforming the shop floor into...more

                  BULLSEYE
                  Situated in a relatively quiet area of Almere, halfway between two prominent shopping centres, this shop ran the risk of being overlooked by the shopping public. Our remedy was bold and straightforward: by transforming the shop floor into a giant dartboard, we provided Almere with a new shopping heart, literally and metaphorically visible for all to see. The striking layout of the store makes for a shopping experience that is hard to forget and maximizes circulation and space. While the circular floor shape guarantees a good crowd flow, the remaining space is used for fitting rooms and storage. One of the only linear objects in the store is a wall entirely covered with dartboards. It is both decorative and functional: the darts star as themselves, but also serve as clothing hangers. Playfulness and efficiency can go hand in hand.

                  Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                  Photography: Bearandbunny
                  Almere / 2007


                  Grand Cafe Usine
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz
                  • photo Arjen Schmitz

                    USINE, LE PLUS GRAND CAFE DU MONDE
                    In 2009 our team transformed the ground floor of the former Philips light tower, a monumental building in Eindhoven that once functioned as a light-bulb factory, into Grand Cafe Usine. We based...more

                    USINE, LE PLUS GRAND CAFE DU MONDE
                    In 2009 our team transformed the ground floor of the former Philips light tower, a monumental building in Eindhoven that once functioned as a light-bulb factory, into Grand Cafe Usine. We based the project on a brief that asked for a coherent concept that would appeal to a broad target group: a plan that would unite food, service, graphic language and interior design into a pleasing and exciting entity. We drew inspiration for the venue from a vintage Philips poster announcing 'Philips, le plus grand usine du monde', meaning the largest factory in the world or the people's factory and came up with the name Usine, le plus grand café du monde. An expansive entrance area underpins the existing architectural language and heightens the atmosphere of grandeur and spaciousness. While selecting materials and developing details, we took great pains to ensure that their contemporary interior would be a seamless match for the traditional architecture and familiair features of the building. The way in which the design melds old and new creates an ambiance worthy of a venerable establishment hallowed by time.

                    Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                    Photography: Arjen Schmitz
                    Eindhoven / 2009


                    Supertrash NYC

                      SUPERTRASH FLAGSHIP STORE NYC
                      Dutch womenswear brand SuperTrash, brainchild of designer Olcay Gulsen, asked us to develop a concept and design for its first store across the Atlantic Ocean. We transformed a dark and old-fashioned office space on Prince...more

                      SUPERTRASH FLAGSHIP STORE NYC
                      Dutch womenswear brand SuperTrash, brainchild of designer Olcay Gulsen, asked us to develop a concept and design for its first store across the Atlantic Ocean. We transformed a dark and old-fashioned office space on Prince Street in Downtown New York City into a light and airy flagship store with custom-made furniture. In the Nolita boutique the label’s collection is presented in a more spacious and luxurious way than in Europe: it’s the store employees who provide customers with clothes that have the right size and fit. The upscale atmosphere of the boutique is further emphasized by the use of sleek, gold-accented glass furniture, comfortable lounging sofas and indirect cornice lighting. Feel like a princess on Prince Street.

                      Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                      Photography: Bearandbunny
                      New York / 2012


                      IN BRUGES

                        IN BRUGES
                        When we first saw the 500m2 former carpet centre in the historic centre of Bruges (BE) we just fell in love with the stale character of the rather run-down place and proposed to retain the soul of the...more

                        IN BRUGES
                        When we first saw the 500m2 former carpet centre in the historic centre of Bruges (BE) we just fell in love with the stale character of the rather run-down place and proposed to retain the soul of the space. Almost all existing elements were preserved – yet used in a new, and at times exaggerated way. Radiators, are given a second life as display fittings. Clamped lamps serve as miniature displays for small goods. Peculiar old-fashioned armchairs with velvet upholstering are scattered throughout the shop. The sliding walls – typical for local party centres – we found in the storage room, are utilized as doors for the fitting rooms. The cashpoint is decked with another discovery we made: paving tiles, which we also used to construct the floor. Together with the original lathed ceiling and striplighting, and plenty of succulents, the shop oozes 'gezelligheid' (enjoyable). A special addition is the presence of two canary cockbirds, who felt such at ease in the shop they gave birth to several young ones six weeks after the store had opened its doors.

                        Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                        Photography: Bearandbunny
                        Bruges / 2007


                        DEPARTMENT STORE BLOB

                          THE BLOB
                          In 2010 a new architectural icon was erected in the city of Eindhoven: the Admirant Entrance Building (better known as ‘de blob’) by Italian practice Massimiliano Fuksas Architetto, a five-storey blobular structure wrapped in a curvy skin...more

                          THE BLOB
                          In 2010 a new architectural icon was erected in the city of Eindhoven: the Admirant Entrance Building (better known as ‘de blob’) by Italian practice Massimiliano Fuksas Architetto, a five-storey blobular structure wrapped in a curvy skin of glass and steel. We were asked to design and build a multi-brand department store inside it within a period of six weeks. It was a challenging assignment, given the narrow time frame, the absence of interior walls and the see-through exterior of the building. To establish a connection between the inside and outside of the building, we created curved, semi-transparent display walls, glass counters and floating clothes racks. Soft, flowy curtains offer privacy for fitting clothes, while simultaneously improving the acoustics of the building.
                          Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                          Photography: Bearandbunny
                          Eindhoven / 2011


                          SWEET SIXTEEN
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz
                          • Photographed by Arjen Schmitz

                            SWEET SIXTEEN
                            For us, it was an age coloured by high school adventures. Think wall bars and gymnastic apparatus. Building tree houses. Greenhouses (John grew up in Deventer). Dutch painter Piet Mondriaan, infamous for his bold figures and his...more

                            SWEET SIXTEEN
                            For us, it was an age coloured by high school adventures. Think wall bars and gymnastic apparatus. Building tree houses. Greenhouses (John grew up in Deventer). Dutch painter Piet Mondriaan, infamous for his bold figures and his use of primary colours. All these childhood remnants come together in the Men At Work store in Antwerp (BE).
                            As shops tend to get a bit boring once you’ve scoped out the space, we tried to add as much alternating elements to keep customers intrigued, and have them return. Instead of a well-balanced variety of interior elements, this fashion shop is decked with everything from a gymnastics buck (the counter), wall bars (display material), bars, squares and circles in yellow, red and blue (fitting rooms) to a greenhouse area (showcasing the shop’s limited collections; the tag of a tee shirt or tank top planted in a flowerpot). The fashion chain’s customized furniture is coated white to emphasize the high school appeal and allow for some unity among the scattered objects.

                            Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                            Photography: Arjen Schmitz
                            Antwerp / 2007


                            Nike CROSSTOWN Runners London

                              CROSSTOWN RUNNERS
                              Where it comes to running in all its shades, Nike’s Crosstown Runners is the new kid in town. Targeted to a specific user group – that is, fanatics who choose the urban grid as their spot of...more

                              CROSSTOWN RUNNERS
                              Where it comes to running in all its shades, Nike’s Crosstown Runners is the new kid in town. Targeted to a specific user group – that is, fanatics who choose the urban grid as their spot of exercise –the corresponding line of sportswear as developed by Nike needed a matching retail concept.

                              Part of a lifestyle trend, the apparel mimics streetwise high fashion. Think sneakers with fluorescent colour details or outspoken graphic leggings. Hence, the input for the new store concept (conceived in one month and go be rolled out Global ) was literally taken from the street. Curve stones from the base of the walls, tramlines support freestanding furniture elements and elevated public benches serve as display systems for footwear. A high level of execution, eye for detailing and gloss finishing discern the store from the real street outside and add value to the apparel on sale.

                              Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                              Photography: Nike
                              London / 2014


                              ACE HOTEL LONDON

                                ACE LIBERTY
                                In 1576 English actor and entrepreneur James Burbage built The Theatre, the first permanent theatre in England since Roman Times. Located in the Liberty of Halliwell, Shoreditch, the playhouse was placed just outside the Puritan jurisdiction of...more

                                ACE LIBERTY
                                In 1576 English actor and entrepreneur James Burbage built The Theatre, the first permanent theatre in England since Roman Times. Located in the Liberty of Halliwell, Shoreditch, the playhouse was placed just outside the Puritan jurisdiction of the City of London. The Theatre had a short, but eventful history: most of Shakespeare’s early plays had their premiere at The Theatre. With the construction of other playhouses nearby, Shoreditch quickly became London’s first theatrical and entertainment district.

                                When Ace Hotel invited us to provide a concept and art direction for their soon-to-be-established Shoreditch hotel, we were quick to make the connection with Shoreditch’s rich past. Our design team imagined the hotel as a stage with an ever-rotating cast and plenty of surprise acts. Stage lanterns, a lifting floor and movable walls make for a theatrical and lively atmosphere, not unlike that of an old-school theatre. As a finishing touch, we envisioned a front desk, sitting couches and a grand piano attached to lifting wires, as if they were props making a flying entrance into a theatrical production: a playful interpretation of Shakespeare’s famous soliloquy ‘All the world’s a stage.’

                                Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                London / 2013


                                Departement Store Amsterdam

                                  SUNRISE
                                  Golden hour, the magical period shortly after sunrise and before sunset, when the light is soft and warm and makes things glow unlike any other time of the day. That was our inspiration when transforming a dark and...more

                                  SUNRISE
                                  Golden hour, the magical period shortly after sunrise and before sunset, when the light is soft and warm and makes things glow unlike any other time of the day. That was our inspiration when transforming a dark and dusty house-turned-office space into the flagship store of fashion brand DEPT. We uncovered boarded-up windows, removed all redundant walls and painted the remaining walls white to allow daylight to flood the store from front-to-back. Since we based the layout of the store on that of a family home, each floor has a different vibe: from the greenhouse complete with hanging plants and a glass ceiling at the rear of the ground floor to the attic, three floors higher, where stacked pieces of furniture function as display shelves. We brought the building back to life.

                                  Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                  Photography: Bearandbunny
                                  Amsterdam / 2011


                                  IN STEREO

                                    IN STEREO
                                    As nearly any shop window is kitted out with the ubiquitos mannequins show, why not take advantage of this and do something completely different? Dubbed by locals as ‘the shop with the music speakers’, the shop window...more

                                    IN STEREO
                                    As nearly any shop window is kitted out with the ubiquitos mannequins show, why not take advantage of this and do something completely different? Dubbed by locals as ‘the shop with the music speakers’, the shop window is left strikingly open, allowing passers-by to have a peek at the wall-sized speakers ensemble inside. Roughly 600 speakers, gathered from various shops specialized in recycled goods; adorn one of the two long entrance walls. To make optimal use of the façade, a conveyor belt showcasing single shoes is running along the base of the floor-to-ceiling shop-window. The lengthy stairs enable visitors to sink into the shop at a slow pace, simultaneously absorbing them into the retail environment. This constant intermingling of randomly positioned tailor’s dummies and real people gives the store a thrilling extra catch.

                                    Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                    Photography: Bearandbunny
                                    Maastricht / 2007


                                    IITTALA LONDON

                                      ENRICH YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE
                                      Since 1881, Finnish design brand Iittala has offered the world elegant everyday glassware with a confident simplicity. For its store on bustling Regent Street in London, we crafted a sober but luxurious interior, combining clean...more

                                      ENRICH YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE
                                      Since 1881, Finnish design brand Iittala has offered the world elegant everyday glassware with a confident simplicity. For its store on bustling Regent Street in London, we crafted a sober but luxurious interior, combining clean lines with an elegant alternation of solids and voids. The glassware is arranged in groups on shelves with different surfaces (solid, transparent, mirrored), giving customers the chance to explore the possibilities of mixing and matching different pieces from the collection themselves. The store’s tile floor is based on patterns by designer Alvar Aalto and references the brand’s roots and heritage. A giant backlit montage of Kivi tealight holders at the rear of the shop mimics iconic Iittala illustrations and draws attention to the new colours up for sale.

                                      Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                      Photography: Bearandbunny
                                      London / 2007


                                      BACK STAGE

                                        BACKSTAGE
                                        Enticed by some thrilling backstage images from the thirties, we took the idea of setting up this 1500-m2 shop as if it were containing a backstage area. Instead of organizing the space in a defined order, we did...more

                                        BACKSTAGE
                                        Enticed by some thrilling backstage images from the thirties, we took the idea of setting up this 1500-m2 shop as if it were containing a backstage area. Instead of organizing the space in a defined order, we did quite the opposite. Arbitrary positioned furniture on swiveling undercarriage is spread throughout the space. Wall units – turned round frames hung on the wall – double as a point of suspension for garment racks. For the flooring, white marber tiles clash with raw concrete. A steel staircase meanders up, its steps narrowing in size the more one ascends, untill it finally splits up in two parts – one accessing the staff quarter while the other part winds up to the top floor. The fitting rooms, too, contain a ‘front’ (on stage) and ‘backstage’ side. Whereas the façades are constructed out of a wooden framework, inside the rooms are decorated with white plywood and velvet curtains. Old-fashioned evergreen plants are scattered among the shop like a piece of scenery – as everything else seems to be.

                                        Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                        Photography: Bearandbunny
                                        Groningen / 2007


                                        Achtung!

                                          1 2 3  ACHTUNG !
                                          We were approached by Amsterdam creative agency ACHTUNG! to redesign their office space into a more efficient layout in an effort to improve employee communication and knowledge exchange. We eliminated the hierarchical seating arrangement...more

                                          1 2 3  ACHTUNG !
                                          We were approached by Amsterdam creative agency ACHTUNG! to redesign their office space into a more efficient layout in an effort to improve employee communication and knowledge exchange. We eliminated the hierarchical seating arrangement of senior and junior employees and designed three enormous custom-made office tables instead: one table that brings together all account managers, a second table that can seat the entire team of interactive developers, and, last but not least, a lunch table that is big enough to fit the entire company. Three new tables as the three steps to an open and thriving company culture.

                                          Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                          Photography: Bearandbunny
                                          Amsterdam / 2008


                                          Cool CAT Concept

                                            RETAIL CONCEPT COOLCAT
                                            In april we opened the first store with Coolcat's brand new retail concept.
                                            1200 m2 of pure fun! more to come...

                                            ...more

                                            RETAIL CONCEPT COOLCAT
                                            In april we opened the first store with Coolcat's brand new retail concept.
                                            1200 m2 of pure fun! more to come...


                                            PET ARCHITECTURE

                                              PET ARCHITECTURE
                                              The assignment of the Men At Work store coincided with our return from a trip to Tokyo and the phenomenon of Pet Architecture (i.e. tiny houses leaning against existing architecture). Those images still vividly captured in our...more

                                              PET ARCHITECTURE
                                              The assignment of the Men At Work store coincided with our return from a trip to Tokyo and the phenomenon of Pet Architecture (i.e. tiny houses leaning against existing architecture). Those images still vividly captured in our minds, we adopted the ‘Pet format’ to the Amsterdam-based store.
                                              Located in one of the main shopping streets, the shop’s interior turned into somewhat of a miniature house, yet we retained the existing layout. Instead, interior elements added to the spacial structure allow for a rather fairy-like environment. One enters the shop through the fitting rooms. A wooden structure wraps around the entires staircase, opening up to the cash desk in the top. Another staircase, positioned below a pallet showcasing jeans, gives the illusion of reaching to a secret space – but actually just comes to a dead end. Scattered around the store are more hideouts, waiting to be discovered by curious browsers.

                                              Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                              Photography: Arjen Schmitz
                                              Amsterdam / 2007


                                              Bachelor LOFT

                                                BACHELOR LOFT, AMSTERDAM
                                                When we were asked to transform this slightly shabby Amsterdam apartment into a modern urban loft for a single, professional male, we set out to restore the classic yet minimal look of the place. By utilizing...more

                                                BACHELOR LOFT, AMSTERDAM
                                                When we were asked to transform this slightly shabby Amsterdam apartment into a modern urban loft for a single, professional male, we set out to restore the classic yet minimal look of the place. By utilizing earthy, natural materials such as unpolished  wood and rough-hewn slate, a rugged, masculine feel was created. An eclectic mix of modern and vintage furniture provides the loft with a timeless, elegant appeal that still holds up today, more than a decade later.

                                                Design Team: John Maatman, Annekatrien van Meegen
                                                Photography: Hotze Eisma
                                                Amsterdam / 2000


                                                Footwork

                                                  MADE BY HAND
                                                  The concept for this sneakers venue was inspired by the shoemaker’s workshop in olden days. Think of an ambiance authentic, dark and warm. A place where the cobbler made shoes made by hand. A niche filled...more

                                                  MADE BY HAND
                                                  The concept for this sneakers venue was inspired by the shoemaker’s workshop in olden days. Think of an ambiance authentic, dark and warm. A place where the cobbler made shoes made by hand. A niche filled with machines, tools on wooden tables and the pungent smell of leather. The shop logo, a +, is a positive sign. The ‘cross’ or ‘plus’ is embedded in all elements of the shop. It is visible as a table, as display blocks and is integrated in the fixtures and wall system. Consciously placed mirrors are containing different functions: low mirrors reflect the shoes one is wearing whereas enlarged shaving mirrors focus on a single pair of shoes. The large wall mirrors surface even more shoes.

                                                  Design team: John Maatman, Breg Schoffelen
                                                  Photography: Arjen Schmitz
                                                  Amsterdam / 2007


                                                  Bearandbunny
                                                  • photographed by Bianca Pilet

                                                    ARE YOU A BEAR OR A BUNNY ?
                                                    The world, is made up of two types of people: bears and bunnies. At least, that’s our firm belief. Bears will always look after you. They’re much more interested in you...more

                                                    ARE YOU A BEAR OR A BUNNY ?
                                                    The world, is made up of two types of people: bears and bunnies. At least, that’s our firm belief. Bears will always look after you. They’re much more interested in you than in themselves. They just want you to be happy, like they are. Bunnies, on the other hand, are a different breed. They’re always running around. They don’t want to miss anything. They always think someone else is having a better time. But they have so much fun.However, this is the reason why a bunny needs a bear to come home to… So does a bear ever need another bear? Well, sometimes bears get fed up with having to take all the responsibility. Having another bear around the house takes some of the stress away. As for bunny-pairing? “That happens too. But it’s a fast-burn relationship. Bunnies get together when they haven’t found their bear yet.

                                                    Call them soft toys for grown-upsif you like. Both are hand-stitched in soft , kid glove leather or suede. Choose your colour to match your sofa, your floor, your favourite shoes or whatever you'd most like to fall asleep next to. This kind of emotional support doesn't come cheap, but what does a good therapist cost these days?

                                                    Design team: John Maatman, Carlijn Kriekaard
                                                    Photography: Bearandbunny
                                                    Amsterdam / 2002